The folks in marketing have long sought to define the typical customer journey, detailing key ‘touch points’ where content, advertising and other activities impact the sales process – either for good or bad. This practice has become more sophisticated, and useful, as social media and mobile technology has dramatically altered how consumers make their purchasing decisions. In this infographic I tried to demonstrate a similar construct for workers in the typical employee journey. This example is generic, but I believe it can be serve as a useful foundation for strategic planning.

I tried to highlight a few key points in this visual:

A wide range of factors influence employees on their work journey: workplace programs and policies, company vision and strategy, corporate reputation, internal communications, external influencers, peers, management style, workplace environment to name a few. Needless to say, the formal communication process is only one part of the equation, albeit an important one.
There are several key players in the employee journey beyond the internal communication team, notably core functions like HR, IT, Marketing and the C-Suite. Too often companies fail to integrate and coordinate the efforts of these teams to execute a holistic and strategic engagement strategy. For example, many companies struggle to present a consistent, compelling message (and image) from recruitment through the interview process to the first day on the job.
Much like in marketing, there are usually a few ‘moments of truth’ for employees that will help determine whether they are/remain engaged fans of the company or become disenchanted and critical, becoming either dead weight or leaving altogether. These inflection points include obvious landmarks in the employment journey (e.g. orientation, annual performance reviews, compensation changes) but also important announcements and multi-audience events, such as mergers or major change efforts.
I didn’t try to detail specific communication tactics for each stage of this employee journey, but clearly an important objective is to match the right content and channel for each of the key ‘touch points’ in this journey. There are some helpful best practices for developing a cogent communication program that targets key situations (for example, boosting face-to-face outreach during difficult or complex change efforts) but I would argue each company needs to define its own roadmap based on their employee preferences, workplace culture and other variables.
What is the typical employee journey for workers in your company? Perhaps there are several distinct paths based on different roles and profiles. Whatever the case it is useful to understand this path from the employee perspective, which will help those managing the process – be it HR executives or communication professionals – to be more responsive, relevant and effective. Ultimately, the lesson here is parallel to the marketing model – to truly be effective we need to put ourselves in our employees’ shoes.

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